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Ghid

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Everything posted by Ghid

  1. Ghid

    Prom Dress?

    Miley Cyrus in my great grandmother's evening gown. http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1336866!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/miley-cyrus.jpg
  2. Ghid

    The nature of slavery

    Someone should say that slavery is not illegal. It is a common financial arrangement between creditors and debtors, which has existed at least since the Code of Hammurabi. We can regulate slavery, but we can't eliminate it. A slave is another person's personal property. Anyone with a credit card can become another person's personal property.
  3. Ghid

    The nature of slavery

    Yes, I might have felt that way when Mr C, my seventh grade history teacher, asked the class to define slave. However, I have found that I own other people's labor just like Frederick Douglass' master owned his labor in Up From Slavery. My father invests for me. One of the companies is Citi Bank. If a person has a balance on a Discover or Sears credit card, that person's interest payments pay my dividends, so in that circumstance, I own his or her labor, and that person (or a prorated portion thereof) is my slave.
  4. Ghid

    Begats to Ascension

    I have returned from the Stone Age. Actually, Mom let me take a laptop; and we did have some electricity, so I was able to keep it charged. This is what I did. I read the Gospels. Recently I read some of a book, The Quest for the Historical Jesus by Albert Schweitzer. http://www.earlychristianwritings.com/schweitzer/ The title misleads its readers. Schweitzer talked more about a Rational Jesus than about an Historical Jesus. In the nineteenth century, scholars tried to apply enlightenment ideas to religion. I know that seems strange on several levels, but I mean that they applied reason. They tried to find rational explanations for Biblical events. Schweitzer’s book tells the history of that process. The scholars also tried to write chronologically about the events in Jesus’ life, from Begats to Ascension. According to Schweitzer, that process has been unsuccessful. So I made a list, and so far I have about 130 parts. Some are duplicates. Some are short, one or two verses, like Mark 1:14-15 (NIV) After John was put in prison, Jesus went into Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God. “The time has come,” he said. “The kingdom of God has come near. Repent and believe the good news!” Some, like the Sermon on the Mount, are more than two chapters long. I still have 10 chapters from Matthew and Luke to edit. Now that I have returned to civilization, I will have less time to work on this, but I think that if I post this thread I will have more incentive to continue. I became interested in this because some of my relatives attend the Disciples of Christ Church. They support Chapman University, which has a Schweitzer Library. So they have an interest in Schweitzer and his ministry. I remember being told in a Sunday School lesson that Schweitzer decided that there is no historical Jesus, except for the Gospels. Maybe other people will want to talk about The Historical Jesus.
  5. Ghid

    Begats to Ascension

    Next the narrative switches to Matthew 2:1-17 in which the magician's visit Herod and Jesus. Herod wants to kill Jesus, so Joseph takes him to Egypt. After Herod dies, they return to Nazareth. Now, the narrative switches to Luke 2:22-52. Joseph takes Jesus to Jerusalem for purification rites, and they meet Simeon, “a righteous and devout” man, who was waiting for the Messiah, and they meet Anna, and woman who prayed near the temple. I don’t what I should make of Simeon and Anna, but I can speculate that they were the first to recognize that Jesus would arrange “God's final climactic act by which He would renew all things and vindicate Israel,” or in modern terms they were the first to recognize Jesus as God. Luke also tells a story about how when Jesus was twelve, they celebrated the Passover in Jerusalem. When they began the return trip, Jesus stayed in Jerusalem, and they found him three days later.
  6. Ghid

    Begats to Ascension

    According to Luke 2:1-21 Jesus’ parents went from the “town of Nazareth in Galilee to Judea, to Bethlehem” to be counted in a census. Wikipedia says that census happened in AD 6. In Luke1, Luke suggested that Jesus and John were born when Herod was king. Herod died in 4 BC. So maybe Luke’s investigation was not as “carefully investigated” as he thought it was, or one or the other date is a typo. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Census_of_Quirinius
  7. Ghid

    Begats to Ascension

    Moving chronologically: While Elizabeth, Mary, and Zachariah deal with the birth of John and Jesus in Luke 1:5-80, Mary’s husband, Joseph, deals with his wife’s pregnancy “from the Holy Spirit,” in Matthew 1:18-24. That must have been a cowabunda moment. Maybe even a what’s-a-cubit moment. It is also a great place for an aria, Zachariah and Joseph at stage right and left and with the women in the middle. With King Herod as the tragic protagonist, the magi could be a gold smith, a myrrh merchant, and frankincense merchant. Relative time 0002
  8. Ghid

    Begats to Ascension

    Yes that seems reasonable to me. When Jesus said in Mark 1:15, “The kingdom of God has come near. Repent and believe the good news,” his audience might have thought that "It would be God's final climactic act by which He would renew all things and vindicate Israel."
  9. Ghid

    I'd love an opinion

    Acts 6:8-15 Episodes 29-30 So antiquity had Babylonian, Grecian, and Judean Jews. I asked one of my Chinese cousins if he knew of Chinese Jews. We went to a Chinese restaurant, and we asked the waiter. The waiter went to get the cook. The cook came from the kitchen and he said something in Chinese. My cousin translated, "We have orange juice, tomato juice, but no Chinese juice."
  10. Ghid

    Begats to Ascension

    The first chronological event in the Gospels’ story (Luke 1:5-80) begins when the angel, Gabriel, who was likely on his way to recite Quran to Muhammad, stops in Jerusalem to tell Zechariah, a temple priest, that his wife will have a son and that he should name him John. Six hundred years later, Gabriel recited the Quran to Muhammad, the Prophet. That is not relevant to the story, but it shows that Gabriel gets around. The text does not say that the son, John, will become John the Baptist. It even asks the question, “What then is this child going to be?” It does imply the child’s VIP status in that “... he will be filled with the Holy Spirit …. He will bring back many of the people ... to the Lord their God. … he will go on before the Lord, in the spirit and power of Elijah, to turn the hearts of the .. disobedient to the wisdom of the righteous …,” The most important part must be that he will “ … make ready a people prepared for the Lord,” which in the modern view implies that he will make people ready for Jesus. At the end of the first century BC, it might have meant that people should prepare for the end of the world. Relative time 0001
  11. The author of the Gospel of John must have believed that Jesus was God. I don't understand how anyone could argue otherwise. A scrap of papyrus in a museum in the UK has some text about Jesus and Pilate. As near as I can tell, it has not been well dated, but it could be second century. https://en.wikipedia.org/?title=Rylands_Library_Papyrus_P52
  12. Ghid

    I'd love an opinion

    Acts 1:12-26 (Episodes 5 and 6 ) I have returned from the Stone Age. When school ended, my family went to visit my oldest brother. Sometimes his living conditions lack plumbing and electricity, so I call it the Stone Age. Anyway, Acts 1:12 says that The Mount of Olives is a Sabbath Day’s walk from Jerusalem. I should wonder if that has become a tourist thing. Do people go to Jerusalem, so they can walk from Jerusalem to The Mount of Olives? The first Christians must have organized themselves like a democracy. For example, they elected Matthias to replace Judas. The text is not clear about who voted. Maybe only the apostles voted, and first Christians organized themselves as an oligarchy.
  13. Ghid

    Begats to Ascension

    I think that John’s Gospel has the best hook, “In the beginning was the word …” in its first verse, but I think that it was not the original introduction. I think that John 20:30-31 might have been the original first paragraph. During a rewrite someone with some poetic talent removed the original introduction and put it at the end of the manuscript. John’s original introduction sounds a lot like Luke’s in Luke 1:1-4 with its I-know-the-truth-and-I’m-going-to-tell-you statement.
  14. Ghid

    Begats to Ascension

    Any discussion of Jesus should begin or end with the Begats, so I tried to compare the two genealogies in Matthew and Luke, and I had a cowabunga moment. Matthew 1:1-17 lists 41 names from Abraham to Jesus. Luke 3:23-38 lists 56 names, and Luke does not mention King Solomon. I had expected closer agreement, and I don't know what I should make of it. I know of one other example where Luke appears to have been dyscalculic, and I might talk about that later. Possible explanation might be that different Jewish sects had different lists, or maybe different translations use different manuscripts. I used the NIV version. Relative Time 0000
  15. Ghid

    Begats to Ascension

    So NT Wright must be Tom Wright the former Bishop of Durham in Northumberland, UK He writes a lot, a sort of James Patterson of Jesus The relevant book might be The Original Jesus? http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-original-jesus-life-and-vision-tom-wright/1114708671?ean=9780802842831
  16. Ghid

    the World and stuff

    I tend to think that rules for me seem easy. I don’t think that people, who are not Christians, have more fun. For example, I have friends, whose families came from China, India, Iran or Vietnam, so I know by simple observation that other cultures have tighter control of their children’s behavior. I don’t need to be told twice that things have a right and a wrong way to do things, but most rules have exceptions, and I think I can be flexible about the rules. For example, I have a driver’s license, but I am not allowed to have passengers unless I have an adult driver in the car. However, if someone needed a doctor immediately and I were the only driver, I would drive them to a hospital if necessary because that would be a reasonable exception. Sometimes I get in trouble because of the rules have a contradictory nature. Dad gave me a credit card, and he told me that if I used it, I should tell him, so he could budget the money. Even more important, I should only use the card in emergencies. I have only used the card once. I went to a movie with friends. That was a rule. I was never allowed to go anywhere by myself. Like I said, I went to the movies with friends. We went on a city bus. After the movie a homeless man approached us. My friends and I decided to buy him food. That is sort of true. More truthfully stated, I decided to use my credit card to buy the man’s food. I compounded the problem because I forgot to tell my Dad that I had spent the money. So some weeks later, I was in my room doing homework, and I heard my dad’s voice. “Ghid!” The tone of the voice suggested that I was in trouble. I love my dad, but I’m really kind of afraid of him. I know he won’t hurt me, but I hurt a lot when I disappoint him. So I began with, “Yes, daddy,” as I sprinted to his office. He asked, or more like he demanded as he waved the credit-card bill, “What is this ten dollar charge on your credit card.” I said, “OMG; I’m so sorry. I forgot to tell you. I bought food for a homeless man.” I thought that was a reasonable explanation, but it only escalated Dad’s anger. “You what? You fed a homeless man? Do you know how dangerous … I felt like I had to defend myself, so I interrupted him, which is another rule I broke, and I said, “OMG, but I only did what I have seen you do ….” I must have looked terrified because he looked at me like he had never seen me before and he asked, “Oh, are you going to cry?” I know that sounds bizarre, but I almost never cry. When someone hurts me, I get angry. I plot my revenge. My shrink says that it has something to do with my lack of parental affection before I was adopted. In my laundry list of problems that my parents inherited with they adopted me, not crying even in the most extreme situations, was one of them. So dad asked, “Are you going to cry?” With all the defiance I could muster as I felt a tear from my cheek, and I said, “Yes!” He smiled and said, “Well, Doctor Doogie,” That is the nickname for my shrink, “will be proud.” Manipulative little me tried to switch from defiance to submission, but I heard my defiance. “OMG, I just fed the homeless man just like you do.” Lots of adults in my family feed homeless people just the way I did. My dad stopped waving the credit card bill. “Look sweetie, this is really my fault. I taught you to do this, but I want to you stop. Don’t feed homeless people unless you are with an adult. Me being contrite, ”Yes sir.” “And next time, remember to tell me that you spent my money.” “Me being very contrite, “Yes sir, I’m really sorry, sir.” Dad opened his arms, “Now give me a hug!” Me feeling like I dodged a bullet, “Yes sir.” I love hugs.
  17. Ghid

    Begats to Ascension

    I'm not sure that I understand the word, "apocalyptic," but I think it refers to anything to do with the end of the world. For things about the end of the world or end times, Schweitzer uses "eschatological." It that the same thing?
  18. Ghid

    Begats to Ascension

    I can see how the Historical Jesus could be used to argue that Jesus was just a man. According to Schweitzer, a scholar, Herman Reimarus, did exactly that about the middle of the nineteenth century. A book, The Passover Plot, a 1965 best seller by Hugh Schonfield uses, IMO. uses many of Reimarus's idea. Seems to me that thinking of Jesus as a man is reasonable because we do think he was a man as well as God. I'm not sure that I can speak for Schweitzer, but I think he agreed with that.
  19. Ghid

    The most important virtue? The worst Vice?

    Virtue - Telling Truth Vice - Telling Lies The Ten Commandments mostly deal with lies and the consequences. Same goes for the Code of Hammurabi.
  20. Ghid

    Romans 10:17

    Paul must have lived at a time when many people could not read. Books must have been too expensive for most people to own any at all. With that in mind, to know anything, people must have had to hear it rather than read it.
  21. I'm on my way back to the stone age where people have no plumbing, and they cook with burning logs. Actually, I'm going to see my brothers. Sometimes they have better accommodations. Maybe this time I will be lucky. I should be offline for maybe two weeks from today, 6/10/15. Ghid
  22. Ghid

    Feminism

    My mother likes to quote Moa Tz Tung. "Women hold up half of the sky." I don't know if he really said that, but I know that in 2009-2010 my father's business had so little business that it paid a negative income tax. My mother, the eternal housewife, works here in the house sitting here in from of this computer. Her income held up more than half of the roof over our heads. With that in mind, I can see how women having careers or "wearing men's apparel" has positive effects.
  23. Ghid

    Feminism

    Alien, me? Well, when I was little, my brothers would tease me about how I had lived among the Ifugao where I lived in an agamang (rhymes with humang ), so technically I might have been an alien before I became an immigrant. The Ifugao had a society something like the Hadza have near the Rift Valley in Africa, birthplace of humanity for over 50,000 years. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hadza_people A Hadza man may not marry until he has killed five baboons. Now that is feminism. http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2009/12/hadza/finkel-text/5
  24. Ghid

    Feminism

    -Can you be christian AND a feminist? Yes -Is feminism good or bad for modesty? They are not related. -What would you define in your own words as the feminist movement? Feminism means that I make the unimportant decisions like where we live, where we work, how many children we have, where we go to church, etc. Then my husband makes the important decisions like who will be president, how to solve conflicts in Ukraine or the Middle East, and what to do about world hunger. -Do you think something has been made a part of feminism that really should not be a part of it? Yes, I think that gentlemen's clubs should not be required to hire male strippers.
  25. Ghid

    I'd love an opinion

    John Chrysostom, Did I say that lots of Christians hate Jews? And I had wondered out loud if some of that hatred stemmed from Acts 1. Well, turns out that maybe not. The real source comes from the Gospels, especially Matthew 25:27, but also others. I should begin with John Chrysostom because his sermons have been a contributing cause in every pogrom for the last sixteen hundred years. https://books.google.com/books?id=JXtTCq7V_0MC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Discourses+Against+Judaizing+Christians+%28The+Fathers+of+the+Church,+Volume+68%29&hl=en&sa=X&ei=_0d0VZ-6LYaYyQTu_4PABw&ved=0CB8Q6wEwAA#v=onepage&q=Discourses%20Against%20Judaizing%20Christians%20(The%20Fathers%20of%20the%20Church%2C%20Volume%2068)&f=false John Chrysostom, who eventually became the Archbishop of Constantinople, lived during the end of the fourth century when Alexandria, Antioch, Constantinople, and Rome competed to lead the Christian Church. He preached homilies in which he criticized Jews, accused them of immoral behavior, and as a priest in Antioch, he accused the Jews of Antioch of crucifying Jesus. He used quotes from the Gospels and the Old Testament to criticize Jews, but as near as I can tell he did not use the Book of Acts. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Chrysostom In his homilies he asked Christians, “Do you fast with the Jews? Then take off your shoes with the Jews, and walk barefoot in the marketplace, and share with them in their indecency and laughter.” This quote suggests that Chrysostom’s main concern might have been Christians who associated with Jews. He saw Judaism as a competing religion, but I don’t know why bare feet should be a problem. Often he accused Jews of being demons. “… the Jews themselves are demons?” So, if I may stop for a vocabulary lesson, I wonder if the term, demonization comes from calling people demons. In some references he sounded like modern day people when he said, “Indeed the synagogue is ... not merely a lodging place for robbers and cheats but also for demons. ...This is true not only of the synagogues but also of the souls of the Jews, …But the Jews practice a deceit which is more dangerous ... “ Lots of modern people believe in Jewish dishonesty, for example WEB du Bois and Henry Adams. He spoke equally harshly about pagans, “So the godlessness of the Jews and the pagans is on a par ... In their synagogue stands an invisible altar of deceit on which they sacrifice not sheep and calves but the souls of men.” I hope this is a metaphor. Or even more bizarre, “No necessity forced the Jews when they slew their own children with their own hands to pay honor to the avenging demons, ... Their ungodliness or their cruelty or their inhumanity? That they sacrificed their children or that they sacrificed them to demons? Because of their licentiousness, did they not show a lust beyond that of irrational animals?” This quote sounds like something I read in the Quran or maybe some other Islamic source. Chrysostom spoke equally harshly about people he called Judaizing Christians, meaning Christians who attended Jewish events, which I think meant traditional Jewish holidays and also secular events like the theater, which Jews attended. In a homily he said, “... demons dwell in the very souls of the Jews and in places in which they gather?... How do you Judaizers have the boldness, after dancing with demons, to come back to the assembly of the apostles? After you have gone off and shared with those who shed the blood of Christ, how is it that you do not shudder to come back and share in his sacred banquet,... “ So Christians, who attended Jewish events, annoyed Chrysostom, and again he he blamed Jews of Antioch for the crucifixion, something in which they could not have participated. When he served as a priest in Antioch, he used Bible quotes to blame Jews for the crucifixion. In at least three homilies he quoted Matthew 27:25. In one he said, “Consider, then, with whom” the Judaizing Christians “are sharing their fasts. It is with those who shouted: ‘Crucify him, Crucify him,’ with those who said: ‘His blood be upon us and upon our children’ ". And in another homily, “For the martyrs have a special hatred for the Jews since the Jews crucified him for whom they have a special love. The Jews said: ‘His blood be on us and on our children’ the martyrs poured out their own blood for him whom the Jews had slain.” So clearly Chrysostom blamed the Jews of Antioch for the crucifixion even though none of them were alive 400 earlier when the crucifixion happened, but he did not invoke the Kingdom of Heaven to rain down fire on the Jews. As near as I can tell, he did not advocate violence against Jews. http://www.preteristarchive.com/ChurchHistory/0386_chrysostom_adversus-judeaus.html I have no idea who translated Chrysostom’s homilies, but various websites appear to use the same source. Here is a google book source, Discourses Against Judaizing Christians https://www.google.com/search?tbm=bks&hl=en&q=Discourses+Against+Judaizing+Christians+%28The+Fathers+of+the+Church%2C+Volume+68%29 Chrysostom appears to me to have considered Jews as adversaries in much the same way that he might have considered pagans or rival Christian factions to be adversaries rather than enemies. To be fair to Chrysostom I should say that he is not alone as a Christian antisemite. He is only one of two thousand years of them.
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