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blackswan41

"All worry is atheism..."

I believe God would rather I quit worrying completely.  

  1. 1. I believe God would rather I quit worrying completely.



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Archbishop Fulton Sheen said, “All worry is atheism, because it is a want of trust in God.”

I attended a christian book study yesterday on Calm My Anxious Heart.

http://www.familychristian.com/shop/product.asp?prodID=43259

Our discussion on worry reminded me that it a rather common experience even among christian's but one which is alleviated through prayer. Prayer is more powerful then one can imagine. Prayer builds trust in God which dispels fear.

In the meantime, here are some ways to cope with worry:

Seven Effective Ways To Cope With Worry

The imagination has a habit of taking fear and magnifying it into horrifying proportions. Then we begin to worry about paying bills, finding or keeping a job, deciding on moving, our deteriorating health, or a host of other worrisome topics. We become afraid of losing what little control we have left.

Much can be done to manage worry, to take excessive worry and turn it into something constructive. Some worry is good as it helps motivate us to get started or finish a necessary task, or avoid danger. Here are seven approaches to employ.

1. Decrease time spent in worry by creating a “worry time.” Find a time during the day when you can relax and spend 20-30 minutes going over whatever you are worried about. Decide on a plan to use in dealing with the specific problem. Ask yourself what information you will need to make decisions on how to respond. At other times, when you are alone and start to worry, tell yourself you will deal with it at the next “worry time” and return to whatever you were doing.

2. Plan for the worst and then devise strategies to deal with the worst case scenario. Another approach to use during “worry time” is to look at the worst possible thing that could happen if what you are worrying about came true. Like you lose your job, and have to move out of your home. Think of all the possible approaches you can employ to deal with those twin changes. Who can you turn to? Where will you stay? Discuss this with friends. Remember, planning is positive as it takes your focus away from the act of worrying.

3. Make a pact with yourself to only worry with a trusted friend. Outside of “worry time” choose to worry only if you can speak with a trusted friend about your worry. Someone else may well be able to give you a new angle to consider. There is a universal need for good listeners in times of distress. Seek them out and make use of the great therapeutic advantage they provide.

4. Take immediate action. Once you have a plan, do something, anything. Start with positive self-talk, then decide who to consult (get all the facts and information about the potential problem), and how you will keep yourself from constantly dwelling on your worry. Perhaps your next step will be sharing your plan for feedback. We all can profit from the observations of others.

5. Try thinking of some of your damaging worry as a form of selfishness brought on by negative thinking. Some people are able to reduce the intensity of worry by realizing that continuous worry is spiritual nearsightedness and simply feeds the internal critic who constantly looks to bring negativity into any existing problem. Keep telling yourself to guard against catastrophizing the act of worrying. Say to yourself, “Its not as bad as I’m making it out to be. I will handle this.” Then employ a diversion or your plan.

6. Be motivated to limit worry by realizing that for every worrisome though you generate you are paying a physical price on the cellular level. Because most worries never happen, keep in your thoughts the valid observation that unchecked worry takes a damaging physical toll; it drains energy. Counter the effects by taking a daily walk or do other exercise to provide a physical outlet for the emotional stimuli to muscles and the elevation of anxiety levels.

7. Prayer works in dealing with worry. At some point during each day—especially at the end of “worry time”—tell yourself you’ve done enough, and hand your worry over to God. Ask for courage and wisdom to choose the right path, to break the out-of-control habit. Fulton Sheen said, “All worry is atheism, because it is a want of trust in God.” Trust God will give you the insights to solve your worries and reduce the stress they generate.

In summary, if you choose to worry, make a firm commitment that you will get all of the information needed to deal with it. Push toxic thoughts into the background of your thought life. Look only at the many possibilities you possess—that is what hope is all about.

Become aware of more possibilities by bouncing your worries off of your trusted friends. Ask this possibility producing question: “What would you do, in this situation?” Take what you can use to reduce worry and let the rest go. You will tame your worries.

By: Louis LaGrand, Ph.D.

http://www.articledashboard.com/Article/Se...Mourning/250627

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It actually does make sense. For a non-religious person, a god worthy of faith could act as a buffer between the hard times in life. I don't quite think that's what Sheen meant; but it's what I got from it.

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It seems I generally manage to write the polls which come out undecided....

As for the point about worry being a sin with 10 members saying "no" and 1 saying "yes", my current tendency is to think worry is a sin.

I know that seems harsh but it can't honestly be honoring to God to live in such distrust of Him. Worry also seems prideful to me as often it appears to be a way to by-pass God and rely on one's own means of dealing with the past, present and future.

Common yes. Divine No.

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It seems I generally manage to write the polls which come out undecided....

As for the point about worry being a sin with 10 members saying "no" and 1 saying "yes", my current tendency is to think worry is a sin.

I know that seems harsh but it can't honestly be honoring to God to live in such distrust of Him. Worry also seems prideful to me as often it appears to be a way to by-pass God and rely on one's own means of dealing with the past, present and future.

Common yes. Divine No.[/b]

I agree completely and it's something I've been thinking about lately because I am definitely a worrier. I think it is a sin, but not worrying is a lot easier said then done. I usually worry when I know I should be doing something but I put it off instead. Believing God is in charge and that I can trust Him is one thing, actually living by it is quite more difficult.

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