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dreamsofsomeday

Questions about using the Lord's name in vain

I have a few questions about using the Lord's name in vain.

1) Did expressions like "Geez" originate from using the Lord's name in vain?

2) Is it okay to use euphemisms, such as "Oh my gosh" in place of using the Lord's name in vain?

3) Is there a more effective way of stopping the habit of using the Lord's name in vain besides just realizing when you do it and trying to correct yourself?

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I have a few questions about using the Lord's name in vain.

1) Did expressions like "Geez" originate from using the Lord's name in vain?

Yes. "Geez", "Jeez", etc, stem from "Jesus".

2) Is it okay to use euphemisms, such as "Oh my gosh" in place of using the Lord's name in vain?
No. If you use a euphemism, you might as well say the actual word.
3) Is there a more effective way of stopping the habit of using the Lord's name in vain besides just realizing when you do it and trying to correct yourself?
You might try reading "30 Days To Taming Your Tongue" for some advice.

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Yes. "Geez", "Jeez", etc, stem from "Jesus".

No. If you use a euphemism, you might as well say the actual word.

You might try reading "30 Days To Taming Your Tongue" for some advice.

You're so harsh Ben.

I have a few questions about using the Lord's name in vain.

1) Did expressions like "Geez" originate from using the Lord's name in vain?

I believe so, I dont say "Geez" for that reason, I usually just sigh or say "ugh."

2) Is it okay to use euphemisms, such as "Oh my gosh" in place of using the Lord's name in vain?

Phrases like, "oh my gosh" or "oh my goodness" are fine. Even when I want to say just "God" in vain I say "gosh" theres nothing wrong with it, because you're not taking the Lords name in vain.

You dont go to heck if you swear to gosh.

3) Is there a more effective way of stopping the habit of using the Lord's name in vain besides just realizing when you do it and trying to correct yourself?

I often say "oh my" and stop there. No one even notices that I do it, so thats a good way... If you're about to say "Oh my God" Just stop at the word "my."

You must also realize what the word "vain" actually means. When God commands us not to use His name in vain, Hes not just talking about certain phrases, what it means is that we cant talk about God or Jesus Christ like they havn't really done anything for us. Nothing they have done for us is in vain, so we dont belittle God by using His name in a phrase that has nothing to do with Him. When we talk of Jesus Christ or God, it is always with respect, hence why it is ok to say "goodness" or "gosh."

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Another way of interpreting "don't take the Lord's name in vain" is this.

We are called Christians.

Christ-ians.

We've taken His name on us.

If we call ourselves Christians but don't live a Christ-like life, we've taken His name, but done nothing with it - it's been in vain.

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Something I've never understood is that "God" is not a name - it's a title. If you were to use "Jesus", "Yahweh", "Elohim", etc, then I understand how it applies to the third commandment.

You shall not take the name of the LORD your God in vain, for the LORD will not hold him guiltless who takes his name in vain.

Though I suppose if you use "my God" in the expression, I suppose it is the same thing as saying one of the names. Hmm.

Edit: This post is not meant to be an answer of any kind, only a further question about the topic.

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I have a few questions about using the Lord's name in vain.

1) Did expressions like "Geez" originate from using the Lord's name in vain?

2) Is it okay to use euphemisms, such as "Oh my gosh" in place of using the Lord's name in vain?

3) Is there a more effective way of stopping the habit of using the Lord's name in vain besides just realizing when you do it and trying to correct yourself?

1) Possibly. I guess so. I don't say "geez"...

2) 'Oh my gosh' is fine. It's not taking the Lord's name in vain.

3) Thinking before you speak? Making an everyday effort to eliminate certain kinds of speech from casual conversations? Realizing that taking the Lord's name in vain is wrong and that it God commanded us not to do it. Idk.

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Another way of interpreting "don't take the Lord's name in vain" is this.

We are called Christians.

Christ-ians.

We've taken His name on us.

If we call ourselves Christians but don't live a Christ-like life, we've taken His name, but done nothing with it - it's been in vain.

Good post.

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Just because I have the horrible habit of swearing like a Marine, when I'm controlling myself I try and use phrases like "oh dear lord," or "What in heaven's name." Otherwise I use geez/jeez all the time.

I honestly don't believe that saying geez/jeez is bad, just like I don't believe that saying Crap, Darn, Heck or Dang are bad.

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I have a few questions about using the Lord's name in vain.

1) Did expressions like "Geez" originate from using the Lord's name in vain?

2) Is it okay to use euphemisms, such as "Oh my gosh" in place of using the Lord's name in vain?

3) Is there a more effective way of stopping the habit of using the Lord's name in vain besides just realizing when you do it and trying to correct yourself?

1) I think that they might have. Language changes pretty quickly, words have trends and go in and out of style just like anything else.

2) I don't see any problem with saying things like, "Oh my goodness" or "Oh my gosh."

3) You really just have to watch what you say. Be conscious of what's coming out of your mouth.

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When we talk of Jesus Christ or God, it is always with respect, hence why it is ok to say "goodness" or "gosh."

If this were true, it wouldn't be possible to take the Lord's name in vain. "Vain" merely means in a disrespectful, irreverent, foolish or careless manner. In other words, when you use God's name (or an equivalent euphemism) in a manner which isn't addressing Him or being respectful to Him/about Him . . . that's a sin.

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Something I've never understood is that "God" is not a name - it's a title. If you were to use "Jesus", "Yahweh", "Elohim", etc, then I understand how it applies to the third commandment.

Though I suppose if you use "my God" in the expression, I suppose it is the same thing as saying one of the names. Hmm.

Edit: This post is not meant to be an answer of any kind, only a further question about the topic.

Well, with monotheism, God isn't a title (that's why it's capitalized), it's a name. Because there's only one.

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Well, with monotheism, God isn't a title (that's why it's capitalized), it's a name. Because there's only one.

I understand what monotheism is. I am not a polytheist.

My question comes from: if there are so many personal names in the Bible, why is "God" considered an actual name and not a title?

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I understand what monotheism is. I am not a polytheist.

My question comes from: if there are so many personal names in the Bible, why is "God" considered an actual name and not a title?

I don't mean to make you feel squirmy, like I said in chat. =O Now I feel mean.

I suppose the distinction, though, is with Hebrew names specifically. All of those personal names are just ways of restating just who He is. Hebrew names are put in place for their meaning not for the sake of calling someone something. People in the ancient days used to spend a lot of time and energy choosing the right name for their child. This is also why Abram and Sarai's names were changed when they entered the covenant and why Jesus's name was hand-picked by God. For the Hebrews, a name was a big deal.

Looking at all the many "personal names" of God in the scriptures, they are really just expressions of his personality and not actually names in our modern sense of understanding. Like "I AM"-- it expresses the fact that God is raw existence. So God becomes just another modern expression of this personality-- another way of saying "El Shaddai" or "Adonai". It becomes a name.

Hm... this is difficult to explain....

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The "Lords name" is YHWH. The Jewish people did not pronounce this sacred name and was instead replaced with Hashem (meaning The Name. Jewish people still say Hashem today, and many Christians, including myself, avoid saying God's name). It isn't just "God." God is a title, not a name. Using His name, YHWH, carelessly and in vain, is the danger.

That said, using Jesus' name in the same manner is wrong as well.

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The "Lords name" is YHWH. The Jewish people did not pronounce this sacred name and was instead replaced with Hashem (meaning The Name. Jewish people still say Hashem today, and many Christians, including myself, avoid saying God's name). It isn't just "God." God is a title, not a name. Using His name, YHWH, carelessly and in vain, is the danger.

That said, using Jesus' name in the same manner is wrong as well.

I have to completely disagree. God is another one of his names.

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I have to completely disagree. God is another one of his names.

Technically, Selah is right. "God" is just a term for "Deity". However, we do use it to refer specifically to Yahweh. So, it would seem to count as term for our Lord, regardless of its origins.

---------- Post added at 01:45 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:43 PM ----------

I don't mean to make you feel squirmy, like I said in chat. =O Now I feel mean.

I suppose the distinction, though, is with Hebrew names specifically. All of those personal names are just ways of restating just who He is. Hebrew names are put in place for their meaning not for the sake of calling someone something. People in the ancient days used to spend a lot of time and energy choosing the right name for their child. This is also why Abram and Sarai's names were changed when they entered the covenant and why Jesus's name was hand-picked by God. For the Hebrews, a name was a big deal.

Looking at all the many "personal names" of God in the scriptures, they are really just expressions of his personality and not actually names in our modern sense of understanding. Like "I AM"-- it expresses the fact that God is raw existence. So God becomes just another modern expression of this personality-- another way of saying "El Shaddai" or "Adonai". It becomes a name.

Hm... this is difficult to explain....

Actually, "I AM" would be more like "The Self-Existent One". Although, the gist about Hebrew names is true. Perhaps this means English names and the like are . . . somewhat inaccurate?

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Actually, "I AM" would be more like "The Self-Existent One".

I'd say it means both and much, much more. :)

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I might add that taking His name in vain can also refer to using it in a prideful manner that gives glory to self rather than to God.

That's what bugs me about people using God's actual name, as if they can say it and use it no problem. It's downright disrespectful. It's not just another name; it's the name of the Most High God. Yet I so many times see people just throw it around as if they were talking about their buddy or their dog.

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I do no think euphemisms are the same as taking the Lord's name in vain. Words actually mean something. God does not mean the same thing as gosh and gosh does not mean God. The two are totally separate words with totally different meanings (gosh doesn't even have one as far as I'm aware).

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I'm quite curious about this topic now. At home my dad freely says c**p, s**t and the F-bomb (censored for Christian audiences), and I don't get in trouble either. Yet if I so much as mention Hell, **** or oh my God, I get in serious trouble for it. Why do some Christians do this?

And to answer the topic, I don't know if it's a cultural thing but over here it seems like it's only older Christians who get offended by this sort of thing. Maybe it's just the ones I know.

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I'm quite curious about this topic now. At home my dad freely says c**p, s**t and the F-bomb (censored for Christian audiences), and I don't get in trouble either. Yet if I so much as mention Hell, **** or oh my God, I get in serious trouble for it. Why do some Christians do this?

And to answer the topic, I don't know if it's a cultural thing but over here it seems like it's only older Christians who get offended by this sort of thing. Maybe it's just the ones I know.

Why do they do that? I have no idea. That doesn't make any sense at all.

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I'm quite curious about this topic now. At home my dad freely says c**p, s**t and the F-bomb (censored for Christian audiences), and I don't get in trouble either. Yet if I so much as mention Hell, **** or oh my God, I get in serious trouble for it. Why do some Christians do this?

And to answer the topic, I don't know if it's a cultural thing but over here it seems like it's only older Christians who get offended by this sort of thing. Maybe it's just the ones I know.

I think that younger generations are desensitized of it and other cuss words.

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