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What is your political ideology?

  

20 members have voted

  1. 1. What's your political ideology?

    • Monarchist
    • Very Conservative
      0
    • Moderate Conservative
    • Classical Liberal
      0
    • Libertarian
    • Moderate Liberal
    • Progressive Liberal
    • Socialist
    • Marxist
    • Other (Please Explain)


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You're well on your way to becoming a capitalist with that attitude!

Bahaha

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Yes, Katy, you are every conservative's worst nightmare politically, but we still love you.

 

N'awww. You flatter me. 

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Moderate Liberal, I agree more with how they manage the economy, along with their stance on social issues.

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You're well on your way to becoming a capitalist with that attitude!

 

I fail to see what that has to do with capitalism in the slightest. 

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How are monarchists supposed to think on fiscal, domestic, and social issues? Does it vary? Or is it what the king or queen and parliament want? This is one view I'm not really too familiar with.

 

Do you known Liechtenstein's political system ?

I think it's a good example of monarchi. According to me, the king should have a big power but the parliament should existe and debate laws. The laws are vote by parliament but the king can refuse this lawd.

I think too monarchi should be a federal system like the USA, where states have big independance I think.

 

Concerning economie, I think capitalism is bad. I think, we need an economic's system which just product what we really need. I think too this economic's system protect the worker. But it's not communism because communism is just an other productivism theory.

Concerning fiscla, I consider state cann't take massive taxes but just take what he need. The State can't take a borrow. I think it's the boss and corporation who are responsable of social system (healthy system etc...) and they payed for them employment.

 

Concerning the social, It's complicated.

 

That's all I thinK ^-^

Edited by Stan'

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I fail to see what that has to do with capitalism in the slightest. 

I believe it was an economic inequality pun.

 

I said progressive liberal. I should have answered Marxist.

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Guest JAG

I believe it was an economic inequality pun.

 

I said progressive liberal. I should have answered Marxist.

 

Indeed.  And, ewww, another Marxist. Don't ya miss the good ol' days when we could turn you into the feds?  :thumbup:

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I believe it was an economic inequality pun.

 

I said progressive liberal. I should have answered Marxist.

Indeed.  And, ewww, another Marxist. Don't ya miss the good ol' days when we could turn you into the feds?  :thumbup:

 

Perhaps the joke failed on me because I am too adroit with Marxism. I actually dare anybody to find much of a concern for economic equality in Marx. The maxim has always been "From each according to his ability, to each according to their need," not equality.  I think people mistake Marxism for a radicalized version of Rawlsian Liberalism. Marx actually mocks this abstract notion that everybody is equal in his Critique of the Gotha Programme. Marxism is about human freedom, not abstract equality.

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Guest JAG

Perhaps the joke failed on me because I am too adroit with Marxism. I actually dare anybody to find much of a concern for economic equality in Marx. The maxim has always been "From each according to his ability, to each according to their need," not equality.  I think people mistake Marxism for a radicalized version of Rawlsian Liberalism. Marx actually mocks this abstract notion that everybody is equal in his Critique of the Gotha Programme. Marxism is about human freedom, not abstract equality.

 

Wouldn't the overthrow of the proletariat be a prime Marxist concept?

 

I'd actually really like you to start a thread on Marxism with an explanation of your views (preferably in simple english) to discuss.  I feel I can learn something here.

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Wouldn't the overthrow of the proletariat be a prime Marxist concept?

 

I'd actually really like you to start a thread on Marxism with an explanation of your views (preferably in simple english) to discuss.  I feel I can learn something here.

 

The proletariat get overthrown? 

 

And I feel like I did a thread like that before.

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The proletariat get overthrown? 

 

And I feel like I did a thread like that before.

I assure you he meant bourgeoisie.

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Guest JAG

I assure you he meant bourgeoisie.

 

Yes, thanks.

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I assure you he meant bourgeoisie.

Yes, thanks.

 

I have to be precise, because in Marxist theory, the proletariat fades away. The proletariat is a class that is dialectically part of the bourgeoisie, held together by the identity of the capitalist mode of production. The father creates the son, but the son creates the father qua father. A father is not a father without the son. With the destruction of the bourgeois order, the proletariat themselves necessarily disappear. 

 

Returning to the original point, the bourgeois order is overthrown in the Marxist revolution, but the express aim is not the removal of inequality. Obviously, the Communist social order will be somewhat equal, but that is not the aim. The primary purpose is the freedom of human labor. That is, Marx absolutely abhors that we moved from a society in which people were basically masters of their own economic activity as a peasant — they had their own little private land that they worked in freedom — to a social order in which we have to sell our labor to another in order to survive. 

 

If I had to sum it up, I should say that Marx was fine with distributism, that Catholic philosophy where everybody has their own space of private property that they labor on and make their own. Marx has no problem with that form of private property. Marx views capitalism as the antithesis of that distributism, because it is fundamentally based on the exploitation of the dispossessed. Capitalism is born from the destruction of that idyllic form of private property. Instead, you have the exploitation of labor, whereby the vast majority are subjected to the domination of the few, in monotonous jobs. Marx is not a romantic. He does not believe we can return to the idyllic past, nor should we. The way forward is to organize modern production is a democratic fashion. 

Edited by Wesker

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Guest JAG

I have to be precise, because in Marxist theory, the proletariat fades away. The proletariat is a class that is dialectically part of the bourgeoisie, held together by the identity of the capitalist mode of production. The father creates the son, but the son creates the father qua father. A father is not a father without the son. With the destruction of the bourgeois order, the proletariat themselves necessarily disappear. 

 

And everyone becomes...

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And everyone becomes...

 

The concept of class is abolished, because class, in the Marxian language, is based on domination and subjugation. If I had to forge a comparison, I should say that Marxism is the political ideology which seeks to re-create the economic sphere in the image of Rousseauian Democracy. It is not enough to have direct political democracy, but the economy should also be a radical democracy.

Edited by Wesker

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