Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
kb5462

Priestly Celibacy

Recommended Posts


I am not convinced that celibacy leads to child molestation, which is implicitly a priori in the article. I also do not think this partner of a priest has made a convincing case as to why the practice should be changed. She talks about the ossification of tradition without reason, but does she provide a reason beyond emotionalism for why it should be changed?

Edited by Wesker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 ​1 Timothy 3:1-7 is often sited as listing the Biblical qualifications for priesthood

 

1 Timothy 3:1-7 (KJV)  1This is a true saying, If a man desire the office of a bishop, he desireth a good work. 2A bishop then must be blameless, the husband of one wife, vigilant, sober, of good behaviour, given to hospitality, apt to teach; 3Not given to wine, no striker, not greedy of filthy lucre; but patient, not a brawler, not covetous; 4One that ruleth well his own house, having his children in subjection with all gravity; 5(For if a man know not how to rule his own house, how shall he take care of the church of God?) 6Not a novice, lest being lifted up with pride he fall into the condemnation of the devil. 7Moreover he must have a good report of them which are without; lest he fall into reproach and the snare of the devil.

 

  Nothing in here supports priest celibacy. In fact, it actually allows and likely supports priest marriage by the sound of it. It also seems to imply that fatherhood actually helps a preacher, as it shows he can be a leader. Peter was married, who many regard as the first pope. His wife actually accompanied him on many of his mission trips and was martyred herself.

 

 The idea of priest celibracy in the Catholic Church wasn't even decreed until the first Lateran Council in 1123 AD. And was likely due to influence by local pagans and fears that priest's children would inherit church lands. The decree actually very much divided the Catholic Church and Martin Luther was quoted in saying it would only lead to rape and masturbation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Martin Luther was quoted in saying it would only lead to rape and masturbation.

 

 

Well Martin Luther was a bigot vis a vis Catholics who routinely contradicted his own doctrine for the sake of getting in a good dig, so who cares about his disgusting hyperbole :D

 

Anyway, I would not be heart-broken if priests were allowed to marry, but I don't see a compelling reason why they should. It's not clear, as far as I know, that celibacy rules lead to abuse. Many single priests thrive and lead thriving congregations. There's a strong biblical case that celibacy, while not a requirement, is virtuous and desirable.

 

*shrug* Catholic culture isn't liberal about sex, and the religion will probably die out before that changes. Priests sign up for this, and so do the congregation. Welcome to the multicultural world, friends.

Edited by Chris-M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally I wouldn't mind if priests were permitted to marry but I'm a sucker for tradition :)

I also feel like the vast majority of priests and seminarians agree with the idea that it's better if they remain celibate and so even if the teaching was changed, most would choose to stay that way and we wouldn't see a marked influx of married priests until some generations after the change was made. Although changing the teaching might give a little increase in numbers of individuals who want to be priests which would be a wonderful thing - I know for many that making the commitment to never be with another person can be terrifying and even upon entering seminary some still aren't sure if that's truly what they want.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×