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Anima Christi

The Most Holy Body and Blood of Our Lord

"He has given us Bread from Heaven, containing all sweetness within It." -Traditional Catholic response prayer. 

I don't know how many Catholic or Orthodox Christians there are on here, but I'm sure that there's at least one out there. As many of you know, Catholics believe that the Eucharist is the Body and Blood, Sould and Divinity of Jesus Christ. He is really, truly and substantially present in the Eucharist. He is Emmanuel, "God with us." He is the Passover Lamb, the pure and spotless victim. He is the Eternal High Priest who offered the perfect sacrifice that transcends all the ages. He is the same Jesus who walked the Earth and is enthroned now in Heaven at the Father's right hand. He dwells among us in the Eucharist, present day and night. He never leaves, and is present in every Catholic parish. 

My devotion to the Eucharist has grown immensely over the past couple months. It came to me during prayer in front of the Blessed Sacrament one evening that Jesus is talking about us and to us when He said "I thirst." From the Cross. Christ does not just love us. He thirsts for us. He thirsts for souls to be brought to Him. And even this does not adequately describe His love. Jesus, who dwells in all the tabernacles of the Catholic parishes is, in this vulnerable state, "least honored and most abandoned." Yet He waits for anyone who wishes to enter His dwelling to be with Him for even a couple minutes to shower them with graces and blessings for the Eucharist is a fountain of love and mercy. There are times in my prayer when I can almost hear Jesus saying "I thirst." But what can I do? I'm just one man. And a very sinful man, at that. But it is this time in front of the Eucharist, kneeling in adoration, that fuels me. 

The Gospel of John says, "God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son..." Of course, we all know this verse very well. But now, take John 6:50, the Bread of Life discourse, into consideration. "Hic est panis de cælo descendens: ut si quis ex ipso manducaverit, non moriatur." Focus on "manducaverit". This is the Latin word for "to eat", "to chew". If you look at the Greek New Testament, they use the word that means "to gnaw on". The Eucharist is the bread of eternal life. It is the Bread of Angels, and the Saving Victim. This is the Wedding Feast of the Lamb spoken of in the Book of Revelation. This Feast contains all sweetness within It. The Church teaches that the Eucharist is the "source and summit of Christian life." Truly, Christ says to us that if we do not eat this Bread and drink this cup, we shall not have life within us. Mass is celebrated every day in any Catholic parish that can do so if they have enough priests. I try to go every day if possible. I cannot imagine beginning the day without being present at this holy banquet. May the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored and loved in all the tabernacles throughout the world, until the end of time. 

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Your devotion to the Eucharist is very inspiring Anima Christi. I am a somewhat lapsed Catholic who is trying to find a way through the world.

I love your refection on thirsting because I occasionally feel that way. In my teens I had a great passion for the Eucharist that has faded over the years due to spiritual laziness and backsliding. This reminds me fondly of some of my personal reflection.

 

One thing I would caution you though if you would hear it. I don't know if this post is for protestants or not, but I would refrain from using latin translations for a protestant audience simply becausr most latin translations have a Catholic lean to them.

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2 hours ago, Zabby said:

Your devotion to the Eucharist is very inspiring Anima Christi. I am a somewhat lapsed Catholic who is trying to find a way through the world.

I love your refection on thirsting because I occasionally feel that way. In my teens I had a great passion for the Eucharist that has faded over the years due to spiritual laziness and backsliding. This reminds me fondly of some of my personal reflection.

 

One thing I would caution you though if you would hear it. I don't know if this post is for protestants or not, but I would refrain from using latin translations for a protestant audience simply becausr most latin translations have a Catholic lean to them.

Thanks for the response, Zabby. The Eucharist, as you can tell is very important to me as someone discerning the priesthood. If you want to know more about Jesus saying "I thirst", read what Mother Theresa wrote about it. When she founded the Missionaries of Charity, she based their entire spirituality on that one phrase. It's some amazing stuff. As far as the Latin translations go, that wasn't really aimed at anyone in particular. I'm just intrigued by the word choice in the Latin and Greek translations of Scripture and the connotation that the words have, so it's just something that I put in there out of personal interest. But I'll take what you said into consideration for next time

Edited by Anima Christi

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On 10/03/2017 at 8:09 AM, Anima Christi said:

The Church teaches that the Eucharist is the "source and summit of Christian life." Truly, Christ says to us that if we do not eat this Bread and drink this cup, we shall not have life within us. Mass is celebrated every day in any Catholic parish that can do so if they have enough priests. I try to go every day if possible. I cannot imagine beginning the day without being present at this holy banquet. May the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored and loved in all the tabernacles throughout the world, until the end of time. 

I asked AwedbyTruth (a Catholic) about John 6:53-54 once and how she understood this passage relates to Protestants, in reference to her/your view on transsubstantiation. Her answer (from memory) was that the RCC's view was that the passage does not condemn Protestants due to their ignorance - there was a specific term used although I don't remember it (this was from many years ago). What is your view?

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3 hours ago, Yoda said:

I asked AwedbyTruth (a Catholic) about John 6:53-54 once and how she understood this passage relates to Protestants, in reference to her/your view on transsubstantiation. Her answer (from memory) was that the RCC's view was that the passage does not condemn Protestants due to their ignorance - there was a specific term used although I don't remember it (this was from many years ago). What is your view?

I believe the term is "invincible ignorance", but I could be wrong on that. It's difficult to really give an answer because there simply isn't one. Theologians such as Thomas Aquinas hold the view of there being no salvation outside the Church. "Exra ecclesiam nulla salus", if you read his original documents. Since Vatican II, this has changed with ecumenism. If someone is ignorant of the Truth, then they can't be held to it. Plain and simple. God is merciful. He probes the mind and knows the heart. He knows what is truly in someone's heart. I simply don't know. I actually don't really have a view on this as I have not yet began to study theology which is when we'll really look into this. Who is saved is always tricky to answer because we simply don't know. We know that there are Catholics in Heaven because of the Saints. We know that people can end up in Heaven, Hell and Purgatory. But we do not know who is where. Hell could be empty for all we know because God's greatest mystery is His mercy. I try not to worry too much about who is where. I jus want to do everything I can to plant the seed of the Gospel in someone's heart and let God do the rest. All I can do is try to provide an example for others, but I often fall short as we all do. My goal is to plant the seed of the Gospel in someone's heart. I can't make them do anything beyond that. Once that's done, it's all up to God and to them. In short, I don't know what to think. Only God knows. Sorry for rambling. I could go on for a while about this. 

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All this religious talk...

Scripture makes everything clear if we yield our hearts sincerely to God. The Holy Spirit is there to guide us into ALL truth.

Concerning Eucharist, We are of the body and blood of Jesus. As we eat the bread and blood of Jesus, we are reiterating our oneness with Him.

 

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On 3/11/2017 at 8:18 AM, Zabby said:

Your devotion to the Eucharist is very inspiring Anima Christi. I am a somewhat lapsed Catholic who is trying to find a way through the world.

I love your refection on thirsting because I occasionally feel that way. In my teens I had a great passion for the Eucharist that has faded over the years due to spiritual laziness and backsliding. This reminds me fondly of some of my personal reflection.

 

One thing I would caution you though if you would hear it. I don't know if this post is for protestants or not, but I would refrain from using latin translations for a protestant audience simply becausr most latin translations have a Catholic lean to them.

I lapse here and there too, love. Don't give up. His love always calls us back to Him. I got you! <3

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On 3/15/2017 at 3:29 PM, Selah said:

I lapse here and there too, love. Don't give up. His love always calls us back to Him. I got you! <3

I'm really trying to focus on getting into a habit of going to weekly mass and daily prayer this Lent.

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On 3/16/2017 at 9:37 PM, Zabby said:

I'm really trying to focus on getting into a habit of going to weekly mass and daily prayer this Lent.

It takes time to build a habit, as you know. I'd say try to pick a time that works for you, and stick with it. But most importantly, don't give up. If you forget, you can't beat yourself up over it. If you skip, go to Confession, know that God forgives you and will always love you and try again next week. Ask God for His help, and He will give it to you. Ask Mary for her intercession, too. To give you some motivation to go, I'd highly recommend a book by Dr. Scott Hahn called "The Lamb's Supper." Its all about the Book of Revelation and the Mass. It really opened my eyes to what is happening during Mass and made me really appreciate the Eucharist. He doesn't use a lot of dense, theological language so it's a nice, easy read. As far as daily prayer goes, start with what you can do. If it's an Our Father before bed, go do that. Work your way up from there. There are other prayers known as "ejaculatory prayers", which are just very short little phrases like "Lord have mercy," or "My God and my All." You can say these any time the urge to pray hits you. You can also pray after Mass if you'd like and spend some time before the Blessed Sacrament. Sorry to ramble, but I love it when someone says they want to pray more often. Don't give up! I'll be praying for you. 

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On 3/17/2017 at 10:19 PM, Anima Christi said:

It takes time to build a habit, as you know. I'd say try to pick a time that works for you, and stick with it. But most importantly, don't give up. If you forget, you can't beat yourself up over it. If you skip, go to Confession, know that God forgives you and will always love you and try again next week. Ask God for His help, and He will give it to you. Ask Mary for her intercession, too. To give you some motivation to go, I'd highly recommend a book by Dr. Scott Hahn called "The Lamb's Supper." Its all about the Book of Revelation and the Mass. It really opened my eyes to what is happening during Mass and made me really appreciate the Eucharist. He doesn't use a lot of dense, theological language so it's a nice, easy read. As far as daily prayer goes, start with what you can do. If it's an Our Father before bed, go do that. Work your way up from there. There are other prayers known as "ejaculatory prayers", which are just very short little phrases like "Lord have mercy," or "My God and my All." You can say these any time the urge to pray hits you. You can also pray after Mass if you'd like and spend some time before the Blessed Sacrament. Sorry to ramble, but I love it when someone says they want to pray more often. Don't give up! I'll be praying for you. 

Buddy. I know you don't know me very well, and you're trying to help. I genuiely appreciate it, but I've read that book and a handful of others on the Eucharist. I went to daily mass for two years during college. I've read some pretty dense theology. I've just let my job transtion to adulthood rob me of some of that passion, and I'm trying to figure out how to balance and order my life. It is disordered now, but reordering takes time and a lot of grace.

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On 3/18/2017 at 10:30 PM, Zabby said:

Buddy. I know you don't know me very well, and you're trying to help. I genuiely appreciate it, but I've read that book and a handful of others on the Eucharist. I went to daily mass for two years during college. I've read some pretty dense theology. I've just let my job transtion to adulthood rob me of some of that passion, and I'm trying to figure out how to balance and order my life. It is disordered now, but reordering takes time and a lot of grace.

Yeah...sorry about that. Guess I got carried away. I'll be praying for you. 

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